Thursday, 27 September 2012

Duly Noted

I've been inspired by Sarah Salway's blog on writers' notebooks and thought I'd share. Here are mine:

 
 
The pink one is my general writing journal. It's an A5 linen-covered notebook with ruled pages, from Paperchase. It's my fifth writing journal since being persuaded to start one, 3 years ago, by my Open University tutor. I alternate between pink and purple because I love bright colours and the only other option is black.
 
If I remember correctly, the official OU writing courses line is to use whatever notebook you're most comfortable with - whether it's an hideously expensive, fancy one or your basic Tesco Value pad. However, my tutor recommended that we use a notebook that feels special. She said it would serve as a reminder that our writing is special and make us value our writing.
 
As someone who has ripped apart and thrown away many notebooks over the years, I can confirm that my tutor is right. While not especially fancy, my notebooks cost too much to rip out pages. Therefore I keep all the scrawled mess and idiotic ideas I come up with, and am sometimes suprised when re-reading to find a gem amongst the dross. It also means I can see how I think and how my writing has developed.
 
The black and white notebook in the photo was a gift from one of my best friends. It's also from Paperchase and I'm using it for a current writing project, to keep all my plans and ideas in the same place. I love the textures of the covers and pages of these notebooks - it's a pleasure to write in them, even when the writing's not so good. I also adore the ribbon markers!

2 comments:

  1. Oh, I love notebooks, Hayley! Those are lovely and thanks for those tips - I'm still not using mine effectively and tend to rip out old pages. Time to rethink!

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    1. Hi Rosemary, another tip given to me by the same tutor is to highlight what's good and ignore what's bad. That way you don't dwell on the five pages of rubbish you just wrote, but on the interesting image you came up with on the second page or an effective turn of phrase on the fourth.

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